*
*
*
*
*Mandatory fields

 Added to your favourites

 Thank you for your feedback!

30.11.20

[Q&A part 2] Humanity 5.0

On 3 November, 2020, Shivvy Jervis - Innovation futurist and expert in human potential - talked about some of the most extraordinary innovations, the ones that are going to move humanity forward and change how we do business - as illustrated in her ‘Humanity 5.0’ concept.

During this live talk, which was followed by nearly 500 people, many of you had questions to ask. Here is the second part of the answers to your questions.

 

History demonstrates that humanity is not always making the best use of new technologies. What will drive these developments and prevent that we lose control on it? How will we make sure that the data presented in AI will be objective and not partial/manipulative?

AI and similar technologies are advancing and iterating so fast that we are just learning to police them properly. The UK’s common law system (where prior court judgements make up semi-official law via case law), once considered archaic by many other nations who relied only on fully written concrete legislation, is very well suited to policing fast moving technologies. 

This means there have been many Acts, Laws and Cases that have helped to prevent misuse of even the fastest moving technologies. A good example is Bridges v South Wales Police, where UK courts balanced facial recognition with people’s right to privacy. 

There will always be misuse of technology. Since the first days of personal computers, people were using them to break into each other’s desktops and steal data or even just prove they could. In modern times, scandals like Cambridge Analytica or the Snowden Leaks have allowed policymakers to act quickly.

A mixture of quick, agile law making and an ethical emphasis on teaching future AI engineers will couple up to ensure we can reduce instances of misuse, and punish correctly any instances of actual misuse that do occur. The general public should also be better educated on their data rights, with topics such as cyber security and digital rights being possible future school topics that would greatly benefit young people as they get older and become part of society. 

In addition, making people more aware of subconscious bias means that they are more able to tackle it when designing software. 

Don’t you think that too technological an impact can negatively affect our customer/supplier relationships? 

I don’t advocate for technologies that aim to replace the human to human interaction so critical in customer or supplier relations. However when it augments human efforts and takes on the tedious repetitive tasks that comprise too much of our valuable time, it is very useful and frees us up to focus on the decision making and relationship building. 

Here are three aspects to consider:

1// For certain use cases such as customer service, research shows that people don’t necessarily prefer a human or a machine. They prefer speed and accuracy. If someone’s internet is off and they need to ring a call centre to organise a fix, then they don’t care about speaking to a call centre in a faraway land for the ‘human touch’. They want their call answered fast, and the issue resolved. If this can be done instantly thanks to technology, people will be happy with that. 

2// The removal of human error helps eliminate mistakes which will also help boost the relationships between customers, businesses, and the B2B element. There is also the factor that no-one can accuse an AI of being rude, and that technology never loses its temper or has short patience. 

3// Technology also enables more inclusivity in customer engagement. Customers who are mute, deaf, or blind all have very different needs and face differing yet significant barriers to getting the customer support they need. Tech like text-to-speech, voice recognition, speech to text, and more all help make the relationship between customer and supplier easier and more fulfilling for a wider range of people. Having a variety of technologies at play helps enable customers no matter what barriers to good customer service may be present. 

What’s the impact of these developments, like artificial intelligence, in the skills we should be looking for when recruiting?

Not everyone needs to be an AI expert, but most workers in industries where AI is becoming a factor should have some familiarity with AI - even if that’s just a short primer course, or even self-teaching from books. 

An understanding of technology is beneficial when working alongside AI or with AI-driven tools. However, people who lack a good technological base, such as many workers who are reaching the middle or later stages of their career, should not be discounted. A willingness to learn new digital skills is often all that is needed, especially with a large existing base of knowledge of their industry to draw from. 

We are now on a much greater transition to ‘soft skills’ rather than concrete certified academic skills. The ability to be agile, adapt quickly, learn new things, innovate, and interact well with others are becoming much more highly sought after than having a dozen or more listed certifications. 

That said, it has never been easier to hire specific skills in new roles such as AI, Machine Learning, or Data Science. In recent years these have become full-blown specialist areas in their own right, and subsequently have become specialisms for education. These include small primer courses in data science online, all the way up to 4-year degrees in Artificial Intelligence which are now offered by many respected UK universities. 

Thanks to the explosion in popularity of these professions, there are more employees than ever before entering the workforce with the right tech skills to succeed in a data-driven world. However, it is up to organisations to create the necessary environments to attract these candidates and perhaps must crucially to upskill or reskill their existing workforce so that they can take their employees along for this digital journey rather than leave them out of a job. 

When we talk of digital transformation in times of Covid, what should we be aware of to give transformations programs the best shot of thriving? 

For true digital transformation in wider society versus solely within an organisation, the factors influencing the best outcomes are different to when we’re referring to change cycles within a company. 

We must not forget these people who exist in the wider ecosystem that enterprise operates in that are currently being excluded by Covid-19 - those sections of society who already risk being excluded from the digital economy such as the elderly, the 1 billion global disabled who now cannot get to courses or receive home visits and those without internet access. A whole host of social segments are at risk of being left behind. 

Are you aware that 1 billion children were ‘locked out’ of virtual classrooms during this pandemic summer owing to the “digital divide” – ie either not having a) proper Internet connectivity, b) the devices via which to access the Internet properly (smartphones, tablets or laptops) c) or the ICT skills in order to navigate the system. 

We also always need a receptive culture for transformation. Other factors that need to be on our radar for digital transformation during a pandemic include: 

A) Emphasis on security and safer digital identity - both for employees as well as end customers and wider society. There is a very real fight for our digital identity and we should see the protection of digital identity as part of best practice company 'culture'. Social media giants want to be our digital passports and companies should help people understand the nuances of privacy or consumer rights and also to move sectors towards a more open ecosystem. 

Without transparency, transformation may start well but splutter and die out quickly. 

B) Consider ‘green transformations’ – Defining and endorsing sustainability targets for organisations is vital, as is encouraging companies of all sizes – startups, SMBs and the multinationals - to vastly improve the environmental footprint of their digital infrastructure. A green transformation cycle goes a long way in embedding sustainability and resource management in the digital economy. 

C) Talent, talent, talent! Giving due value to new talent, bright minds and ideas and welcoming the more maverick thinkers translates into good business outcomes. These are the thought leaders and experts whose ideas may initially make some of one think ‘That sounds a little risky, I’m not quite sure’. 

However these maverick thinkers often trigger better transformation outcomes owing to encouraging the experimentation that many companies desperately need in order to scale up. 

The dynamics from a pandemic mean transformation programmes formerly mapped out on a two-year timeframe are now being accelerated to an 8 month schedule! By virtue of this we will see more experimentation and rapid deployment to test new tools. Workforces will respond to this and feedback loops will become faster and more efficient from this.

Technology also enables more inclusivity in customer engagement.

Shivvy Jervis, Innovation futurist and keynote speaker

You may also like

  25.11.20 [Q&A part 1] Humanity 5.0

On 3 November, 2020, Shivvy Jervis - Innovation futurist and expert in human potential - talked about some of the most extraordinary innovations, the ones that are going to move humanity forward and change how we do business - as illustrated in her ‘Humanity 5.0’ concept.

During this live talk, which was followed by nearly 500 people, many of you had questions to ask. Shivvy answers the questions still awaiting an answer in a two-part article.
In this first part, she looks at issues like the ecological impact of emerging technologies, worldwide disparities and the dangers as well as the benefits of these new technologies.

Enjoy!

 
  16.11.20 [Replay] Humanity 5.0: the future of our human potential

During the live-talk on 3rd November, Innovation futurist and keynote speaker Shivvy Jervis introduced us her “Humanity 5.0” concept. Through active dialogue and moving multimedia, in less than one hour, she presented us some digital and technological breakthroughs. She focused on the most human centred advances as she believes “it is crucial to take humanity and people to the same pace as technological development”.

In this talk, you will discover which innovations will enhance our capability, how to use technology for social good and create lasting impact on organisations, society and citizens.

The video is available in English with English, French and German subtitles.

 
  18.02.19 Artificial intelligence today and tomorrow I Daniel Hulme.

Daniel Hulme held a conference about artificial intelligence (AI) on November 15th at Hager Forum. In this interview he explains what AI is and how to differentiate it from optimisation processes.  

 

[Q&A part 1] Humanity 5.0

On 3 November, 2020, Shivvy Jervis - Innovation futurist and expert in human potential - talked about some of the most extraordinary innovations, the ones that are going to move humanity forward and change how we do business - as illustrated in her ‘Humanity 5.0’ concept.

During this live talk, which was followed by nearly 500 people, many of you had questions to ask. Shivvy answers the questions still awaiting an answer in a two-part article.
In this first part, she looks at issues like the ecological impact of emerging technologies, worldwide disparities and the dangers as well as the benefits of these new technologies.

Enjoy!


[Replay] Humanity 5.0: the future of our human potential

During the live-talk on 3rd November, Innovation futurist and keynote speaker Shivvy Jervis introduced us her “Humanity 5.0” concept. Through active dialogue and moving multimedia, in less than one hour, she presented us some digital and technological breakthroughs. She focused on the most human centred advances as she believes “it is crucial to take humanity and people to the same pace as technological development”.

In this talk, you will discover which innovations will enhance our capability, how to use technology for social good and create lasting impact on organisations, society and citizens.

The video is available in English with English, French and German subtitles.


Artificial intelligence today and tomorrow I Daniel Hulme.

Daniel Hulme held a conference about artificial intelligence (AI) on November 15th at Hager Forum. In this interview he explains what AI is and how to differentiate it from optimisation processes.  


25.11.20

[Q&A part 1] Humanity 5.0

On 3 November, 2020, Shivvy Jervis - Innovation futurist and expert in human potential - talked about some of the most extraordinary innovations, the ones that are going to move humanity forward and change how we do business - as illustrated in her ‘Humanity 5.0’ concept.

During this live talk, which was followed by nearly 500 people, many of you had questions to ask. Shivvy answers the questions still awaiting an answer in a two-part article.
In this first part, she looks at issues like the ecological impact of emerging technologies, worldwide disparities and the dangers as well as the benefits of these new technologies.

Enjoy!

16.11.20

[Replay] Humanity 5.0: the future of our human potential

During the live-talk on 3rd November, Innovation futurist and keynote speaker Shivvy Jervis introduced us her “Humanity 5.0” concept. Through active dialogue and moving multimedia, in less than one hour, she presented us some digital and technological breakthroughs. She focused on the most human centred advances as she believes “it is crucial to take humanity and people to the same pace as technological development”.

In this talk, you will discover which innovations will enhance our capability, how to use technology for social good and create lasting impact on organisations, society and citizens.

The video is available in English with English, French and German subtitles.

18.02.19

Artificial intelligence today and tomorrow I Daniel Hulme.

Daniel Hulme held a conference about artificial intelligence (AI) on November 15th at Hager Forum. In this interview he explains what AI is and how to differentiate it from optimisation processes.